Coolidge Blog

The Great 1928 Budget Debate

We tend to project our own assumptions about party positions onto events long past. For example, we assume that Democrats always advocated for increased government spending, at least more so […]

The Coolidges Move West

Are you a Coolidge? Coolidge family members and friends will be gathering at Plymouth Notch, Vt to mark the 99th anniversary of Coolidge’s historic homestead inauguration. Below, attendee Christine Coolidge […]

Tige, the Presidential Cat, Goes Missing in A Snowstorm: Radio Comes to The Rescue.

By Jerry Wallace The Coolidges were both pet lovers. The President was particularly fond of cats, while the First Lady was partial to dogs. A pair of kittens arrived at […]

The President’s Son and the Railroad

By John Ferrell If historians were asked to list similarities between Robert Todd Lincoln and John Coolidge, they would quickly answer that both were sons of presidents from humble beginnings. […]

Higher Teacher Pay, Please

February 20, 2014

Coolidge honored teachers, and often supported pay raises for them.

In 1919, the same year that he opposed a public-sector police union, Coolidge wrote from Boston to the mayor of Northampton that he was concerned about teachers’ compensation: “It has become notorious that the pay for this most important function is much less than that which prevails in commercial life and business activities.”

Coolidge quoted Roger Ascham, the teacher of Queen Elizabeth, on the absurdity of underpaying teachers: “God that sitteth in Heaven laugheth their choice to scorn.”

Coolidge even believed that the federal government ought to create something that did not, then, yet exist, a Department of Education in Washington. “Much good could be accomplished through the establishment of a Department of Education,” he wrote, for example, in his December 6, 1927 State of the Union address.

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