Coolidge Blog

The Great 1928 Budget Debate

We tend to project our own assumptions about party positions onto events long past. For example, we assume that Democrats always advocated for increased government spending, at least more so […]

The Coolidges Move West

Are you a Coolidge? Coolidge family members and friends will be gathering at Plymouth Notch, Vt to mark the 99th anniversary of Coolidge’s historic homestead inauguration. Below, attendee Christine Coolidge […]

Tige, the Presidential Cat, Goes Missing in A Snowstorm: Radio Comes to The Rescue.

By Jerry Wallace The Coolidges were both pet lovers. The President was particularly fond of cats, while the First Lady was partial to dogs. A pair of kittens arrived at […]

The President’s Son and the Railroad

By John Ferrell If historians were asked to list similarities between Robert Todd Lincoln and John Coolidge, they would quickly answer that both were sons of presidents from humble beginnings. […]

Kill Bad Bills

February 20, 2014

The more legislation, the better.

That’s the attitude of most Americans these days. After all, it’s not uncommon to hear lawmakers get criticized for “doing nothing.” But Coolidge viewed doing nothing as a virtue – at least when it came to legislating.

As early as 1910, the Massachusetts politician started to voice concerns about a surfeit of laws. This shows in a letter the younger Coolidge wrote his father John, who was a new senator in Vermont. “It is much more important to kill bad bills than to pass good ones,” the 38-year old Coolidge counseled his 65-year old father.

Later, Coolidge raised the point again: “Don’t hurry to legislate,” he told fellow lawmakers when he became president of the Massachusetts senate.

2 Responses to “Kill Bad Bills”

  1. thanks for sharing this amazing information. I was in need of that. Keep posting and sharing.

  2. Heidi A.

    This quote really got me thinking, and it’s very relevant to today’s political scene. Thank you!

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